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How Can I Find Out the Vehicle’s Emissions Rating Using the VIN?

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What is a Vehicle Emissions Rating?

Vehicle emissions rating is a numerical score given to a vehicle based on the amount of pollutants it emits. The rating is based on the U.S. Vehicle Emissions Standards, which incorporate specific thresholds for nitrogen oxides, non-methane organic gas, carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and formaldehyde. A higher rating indicates a cleaner vehicle, with a rating of 10 being the cleanest. The rating can be found on the vehicle’s window sticker or the EPA’s vehicle emissions label, located either under the hood or in the engine compartment. The ratings are important for reducing air pollution and improving public health.

 

What Factors Should you Consider When Looking for a Car with Low Emissions?

1. Vehicle emissions rating

When looking for a low-emissions car, it is important to consider the vehicle emissions ratings. The smog rating scale is based on US Vehicle Emissions Standards, which are thresholds for nitrogen oxides, non-methane organic gas, carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and formaldehyde. The rating is on a scale of one to ten, with vehicles that score a ten being the cleanest. This means that a car with a smog rating of 8 will emit about one-fifth of the emissions of a car with a smog rating of 5, resulting in cleaner air for our environment.

In addition to new cars, the smog ratings can also be found for used cars, by visiting fueleconomy.gov. There you can compare cars side-by-side, and find the cleanest car that meets your needs. For cars purchased from a private-party seller, the emissions information can be found on the Vehicle Emissions Control Information placard. Even for older vehicles, you can make an informed choice based on the car’s impact to the environment.

In conclusion, it is important to look at the smog ratings when looking for a low-emissions car, as it provides an indication of how much the car will pollute the environment. By considering the smog rating when looking for a car, you can make an informed choice that will help to protect the environment.

2. Vehicle emissions testing requirements

Step 1: Understand the Basic Requirements. In the United States, most 1996 and newer gas-powered passenger vehicles are required to receive an emissions inspection after they are four years old. The inspection month typically coincides with the expiration date of the vehicle license plate, meaning even model-year vehicles will be inspected during even years, and odd model-year vehicles will be inspected in odd years.

Step 2: Determine if Your Vehicle is Exempt from Emissions Testing. Certain vehicles are exempt from emissions testing. These exemptions vary by state, and could include vehicles that are more than 25 years old, or those powered by diesel fuel. Guidance from your local Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) or Air Care Colorado office can help you determine if your vehicle is exempt from emissions testing.

Step 3: Obtain an Emissions Testing Coupon. If your vehicle is not exempt from emissions testing, you must obtain an emissions testing coupon from your local DMV or Air Care Colorado office. As of August 10, 2022, customers must be informed of the extended five-business-day liability period for vehicles purchased after that date.

Step 4: Find a Test Station. Once you have obtained your emissions testing coupon, you can find a test station near you. The Illinois EPA oversees its vehicle emissions inspection program that is operated by its contractor. For more information, you can visit the Illinois Air Team website or call the Air Team Call Center at 844-258-9071.

Step 5: Perform the OBDII Test. If your vehicle is required to receive an OBDII emissions test, and it does not qualify for a waiver, the vehicle must pass that inspection in order to receive an inspection sticker.

Step 6: Find Your Vehicle’s Emission Label. Your vehicle has an emission label located under the hood or in the engine compartment. This label will provide you with information about the emissions limits for your vehicle, as well as other important information.

Step 7: Receive Your Inspection Sticker. After you have passed the OBDII test, you will receive your inspection sticker. This sticker will certify that your vehicle meets the required emissions standards and is safe to drive.

3. Vehicle emissions testing facilities

4. Vehicle emissions testing process

The emissions testing process for cars in Illinois begins with a pre-test of the vehicle’s On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) system. The OBD system runs a series of tests to check the emissions levels and identify any malfunctioning parts that need to be repaired.

Once the pre-test is completed, the vehicle is taken to an Air Team Testing Station to receive a full emissions inspection. The testing station will check the exhaust system and the vehicle’s fuel system to ensure that it meets the state’s emissions standards.

After the inspection, the vehicle is given a pass or fail grade. If the vehicle passes, the test result is sent to the Illinois Secretary of State’s Office and the vehicle is registered. If the vehicle fails, the owner must repair any malfunctioning parts and bring the car back to the testing station for a re-test.

The vehicle emissions inspection is required once the car is four years old. The inspection month coincides with the expiration date of the vehicle license plate. Typically, even model-year vehicles are inspected during even years, and odd model-year vehicles are inspected in odd years.

If you have any questions about the emissions testing process, you can contact the Division of Motor Vehicles Emissions Team at 303.205.5603.

5. Vehicle emissions testing results

6. Vehicle emissions inspection program

The vehicle emissions inspection program is a part of the Illinois EPA’s strategy to reduce air pollution in Illinois and bring the Chicago and Metro-East areas into attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). This program requires vehicles to undergo an On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) test to identify malfunctioning emission control systems that often result in vehicles exceeding federal emission standards. By requiring repairs on such vehicles, the emissions inspection program helps clean the air and reduce air pollution while also improving the vehicle’s performance and fuel economy. Therefore, it is important to consider the emissions inspection program when looking for a car with low emissions, as the vehicle should pass the required emission tests in order to be considered compliant with emissions regulations.

7. Vehicle emissions inspection stickers

Vehicle emissions inspection stickers have a major impact on the search for a low-emissions car. Motor vehicle exhaust emissions are a major contributor to air pollution, and an inspection program is necessary to reduce these emissions. The Illinois Vehicle Emissions Inspection Law of 2005 requires a vehicle emissions inspection program to reduce air pollution from motor vehicles in certain areas of Illinois. Through the On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) test, vehicle emissions inspections in Illinois identify malfunctioning emission control systems that often result in vehicles exceeding federal emission standards, and this helps clean the air while improving the vehicle’s performance and fuel economy. Most 1996 and newer gasoline-powered passenger vehicles are subject to emissions inspections after they are four years old. Additionally, the failure of the vehicle to pass the inspection can prevent the renewal of the vehicle registration. This requirement ensures that low-emissions cars are properly maintained and running efficiently, making them a desirable choice for those looking for an eco-friendly car.

8. Vehicle emissions inspection requirement

The emissions inspection requirement for cars with low emissions is that they must pass an emissions inspection within 90 days of establishing residency in the program area in order to be registered. Exceptions can be made for vehicles brought into the program area that have not yet reached the seventh model year, and these vehicles do not require an emissions inspection at the time of registration. However, vehicles require an emissions inspection once they reach the eighth model year. Used vehicles offered for sale must have an updated emissions inspection even if the current inspection report has not yet expired, unless they have at least one year (365 days) remaining on the original seven-model-year exemption. In Illinois, the federal Clean Air Act requires vehicle emissions inspection programs in large, urbanized areas that do not meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone. This program is used to reduce air pollution from motor vehicles and improve air quality and public health in Illinois.

9. Vehicle emissions inspection stations

Vehicle emissions inspection stations play a critical role in reducing air pollution and improving public health in Illinois, Colorado and Massachusetts. By requiring regular inspections, it helps identify and repair malfunctioning vehicle emission control systems that often result in vehicles exceeding federal emission standards. This helps to clean the air while also improving the vehicle’s performance and fuel economy. Additionally, the safety inspection programs help to ensure that vehicles are safe and roadworthy. As a result, consumers looking for a low-emissions car can be confident that they are not just buying a vehicle with a low emissions rating, but that the car is safe to drive as well.

10. Vehicle emissions inspection report

An emissions inspection report is a document that is used to certify the level of air pollutants, like carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and hydrocarbons, that a motor vehicle is emitting. This report is important to consider when looking for a low emissions vehicle because it provides a snapshot of the current state of the vehicle’s emissions. The lower the levels of pollutants, the less of an impact the vehicle will have on the environment. Additionally, vehicles that have cleaner emissions are more fuel-efficient, which helps save money on fuel costs. Emissions inspections are mandated by federal Clean Air Act laws, and in Illinois, the EPA’s vehicle emissions inspection program helps to reduce air pollution and bring the Chicago and Metro-East St. Louis areas into attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone. If a vehicle does not pass the emissions inspection, it is required to have repairs to bring it into compliance. Thus, the emissions inspection report is a valuable tool for car buyers in order to know the vehicle’s emissions levels and determine if it is suitable for their needs and the environment.

11. Vehicle emissions inspection station locations

Where are emissions inspection stations located? Emissions inspection stations can be found in various locations across the state of Illinois, including centralized Air Care Colorado emissions inspection stations, independent emissions inspection stations in both the Enhanced and Basic emissions program areas, licensed diesel emissions inspection stations, some motor vehicle dealerships, some County Clerk and Recorder offices, and some law enforcement agencies. However, it is important to note that some county clerks and law enforcement agencies do not provide this service, so it is recommended to call ahead to make sure this service is available before going to a county clerk’s office or law enforcement agency for a VIN verification. Additionally, motor vehicles have an emission label located under the hood or in the engine compartment.

12. Vehicle emissions inspection stations near me

Step 1: Check the label in the engine compartment of your vehicle. Most motor vehicles have an emission label located under the hood or in the engine compartment.

Step 2: Visit the Illinois EPA website at www.illinoisairteam.net to find a test station closest to you. You may also click the link to see a List of Stations and wait times.

Step 3: Visit a certified emissions repair facility near you. Certified emissions repair facilities can offer additional testing to determine if your car has low emissions.

Step 4: Have your vehicle inspected by a licensed emissions inspection station. Licensed emissions inspection stations can test your vehicle to determine if it meets federal emission standards.

Step 5: Have your vehicle’s VIN number verified. This can be done at some motor vehicle dealerships, some County Clerk and Recorder offices, and some law enforcement agencies.

13. Vehicle emissions inspection stations near you

Step 1: Determine whether your car needs an emissions test. Most gasoline-powered cars built after 1996 need to be tested after they are four years old. Check your vehicle’s emission label, located under the hood or in the engine compartment, to confirm the model year and whether your car needs an emissions test.

Step 2: Find an emissions inspection station near you. Visit the Illinois Air Team website to find a list of authorized emissions testing locations and wait times. The Illinois EPA also partners with motor vehicle dealerships, law enforcement agencies, county clerks and recorders, and the Centralized Air Care Colorado emissions inspection stations. Call ahead to make sure a location provides the service before you go.

Step 3: Have your car tested. At the emissions testing station, a technician will plug an On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) scanner into the diagnostic port of your vehicle to test the emissions. The OBD scanner will identify any malfunctioning emission control systems that may cause your vehicle to exceed federal emission standards.

Step 4: Get the results. The technician will provide you with the results of the emissions test. If your car fails, the technician will provide you with a list of recommended fixes to help reduce air pollution and improve your vehicle’s performance and fuel economy.

14. Vehicle emissions inspection stations near you

Step 1: Visit the Illinois Air Team website to check the status of emissions testing locations in the state of Illinois.

Step 2: Click the link to see a List of Stations and wait times.

Step 3: If you have any questions, call the Air Team Call Center at 844-258-9071.

Step 4: Determine if your vehicle is eligible for an emissions inspection, as most vehicles that are four years old or newer (e.g. 2012 vehicles are being inspected in 2016 for the first time) are required to have an emissions inspection.

Step 5: Find a test center nearby using the Illinois EPA website, or using other resources such as the Centralized Air Care Colorado emissions inspection stations, independent emissions inspection stations, diesel emissions inspection stations, motor vehicle dealerships, county clerk and recorder offices, and law enforcement agencies.

Step 6: Once you have located an emissions inspection station, call ahead to make sure that the station offers low emissions tests.

Step 7: Bring your vehicle to the emissions inspection station and have it tested.

Step 8: After the test, the station will provide you with the results of the emissions test. If the vehicle has low emissions, you will be issued a certificate of compliance.

15. Vehicle emissions inspection stations near me

Step 1: Check the vehicle’s emission label. Most motor vehicles have an emission label located in the engine compartment or under the hood. This label will indicate the emissions level of the vehicle.

Step 2: Take the vehicle to a certified emissions repair facility. These facilities can inspect the vehicle and give you an accurate assessment of the emissions level.

Step 3: Have the vehicle VIN verified. The Colorado Division of Motor Vehicles requires all vehicles to have their VIN verified before they can be registered. This can be done at some county clerk and recorder offices, some law enforcement agencies, and some motor vehicle dealerships. Call ahead to make sure this service is available before going to one of these locations.

Step 4: Take the vehicle to an emissions testing station. The Illinois Air Team website has a list of testing stations and wait times. You can also call the Air Team Call Center at 844-258-9071 for more information. Once the vehicle has been tested, you will be able to determine if it meets the emissions standards.

16. Vehicle emissions inspection station reviews

Step 1: Visit the Illinois Air Team website to find out the status of Illinois Air Team emissions testing locations. You can also click the link to view a list of stations and wait times.

Step 2: If you want more information about the Illinois EPA’s vehicle emissions inspection program, visit www.illinoisairteam.net.

Step 3: Search for local emissions inspection stations. You can find independent emissions inspection stations in both the Enhanced and Basic emissions program areas, as well as diesel emissions inspection stations, motor vehicle dealerships, and some County Clerk and Recorder offices.

Step 4: Contact the inspection station. Contact the emissions inspection station you are considering to ask any questions you may have or to schedule an appointment.

Step 5: Read reviews. Once you have chosen an emissions inspection station, search online for reviews of the station and talk to friends and family who may have used the station in the past. This will help you get an idea of the level of service and quality of the inspection station.

17. Vehicle emissions inspection stations near me

Step 1: Determine if your car is registered in the state of Colorado. If it is, then you will need to get a vehicle emissions inspection.

Step 2: Locate the nearest emissions inspection station. You can use the Illinois Air Team website to find a list of stations and wait times. You may also be able to find a station through Centralized Air Care Colorado, independent emissions inspection stations, licensed diesel emissions inspection stations, some motor vehicle dealerships, some county clerk and recorder offices, and some law enforcement agencies.

Step 3: Make sure to check the emission label located under the hood or in the engine compartment of the vehicle. This will help you determine if the car has low emissions.

Step 4: Go to the emissions inspection station to get the car tested. The station will evaluate the vehicle to determine the reason for the emissions failure.

Step 5: If the car fails the emissions test, you may be able to get it repaired for free at a certified emissions repair facility.

18. Vehicle emissions inspection station hours of operation

When looking for a car with low emissions, it is important to consider the hours of operation of an emissions inspection station. Air Care Colorado, the organization responsible for emissions testing in Colorado, offers centralized and independent emissions inspection stations, as well as licensed diesel emissions inspection stations, motor vehicle dealerships, county clerk and recorder offices, and law enforcement agencies that all provide testing services.

Centralized Air Care Colorado emissions inspection stations are typically open for longer hours than the independent ones. Air Care Colorado stations may operate from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, with extended hours during peak seasons. Independent emissions inspection stations, however, may operate from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, with Saturday and Sunday service only being offered in certain areas. Licensed diesel emissions inspection stations may also have similar hours of operation, however they may be more limited due to the specialized equipment needed to test diesel vehicles.

Motor vehicle dealerships and county clerk and recorder offices are usually open normal business hours, although their emissions testing services may be limited to specific days or times. Law enforcement agencies may also offer emissions testing services, however these services may be limited to certain days of the week or times, and may require an appointment.

When looking for a car with low emissions, it is important to consider the hours of operation of an emissions inspection station in order to ensure that you are able to get the car tested in a timely manner. It is also important to consider the type of services offered by the various inspection stations in order to determine which one best meets your needs.

19. Vehicle emissions inspection station address

The location of an emissions inspection station can have a significant effect on the search for a low-emissions car. This is because emissions inspections are required in certain areas in order to meet air quality standards. Without the emissions tests, it can be difficult to know whether a vehicle is performing at the level it should be. Having access to a nearby emissions inspection station makes it easier for car buyers to make an informed decision about the level of emissions of the car they are looking for. Additionally, emissions testing centers may provide other services such as OBD tests, which can help identify potential issues with the vehicle’s emission system. This can lead to more reliable information about how well a vehicle is performing in terms of emissions, making it easier to find a low-emissions car with confidence.

20. Vehicle emissions inspection station phone number

Step 1: To find the phone number of an emissions inspection station, first find out which program area you are in. The state of Colorado operates Emissions Technical Centers in the program area and independent emissions inspection stations in both the Enhanced and Basic emissions program areas.

Step 2: Find out if your vehicle is gasoline-powered or diesel-powered, as this will determine which type of emissions inspection station you need to contact. Licensed diesel emissions inspection stations are available, as well as some motor vehicle dealerships, county clerk and recorder offices, and law enforcement agencies.

Step 3: Contact the state of Colorado at 303-744-2442 and press 3 for more information and an appointment if you are within the state’s program area. If your vehicle is diesel-powered, call the Air Care Colorado Hotline at 303-456-7090.

Step 4: For the status of Illinois Air Team emissions testing locations, visit the Illinois Air Team website to see a List of Stations and wait times. If you have questions, call the Air Team Call Center at 844-258-9071.

Step 5: To find a test station closest to your location, visit the Illinois EPA website to view their vehicle emissions inspection program map.

Step 6: Alternatively, you can contact your local motor vehicle dealership, county clerk’s office, or law enforcement agency for a VIN verification if they offer emissions testing.

 

How to Find Out the Vehicle’s Emissions Rating Using the VIN?

Step 1: Find out the vehicle’s vin code

Finding your vehicle’s VIN code is an important and easy step to take when researching and registering a car. Here are the steps to find your car’s VIN code:

Look at the VIN plate located on the driver’s side of the dashboard just below the windshield. This plate should have a 17-character alphanumeric identifier or a manufacturer’s serial number.

If the VIN plate isn’t visible, check the driver-side doorframe label.

Check the documents related to the vehicle’s registration, title, and insurance.

If you already have a Mopar ® account, sign into it to find out if there are any current recalls for your vehicle or to get reimbursed for previous recall-related costs.

If you don’t have a Mopar ® account, you can use a VIN decoder site to find plenty information about your car.

By using your car’s VIN code, you can access important information about your vehicle, such as the manufacturer, model year, engine installed, body style, and production number. This information can make sorting online searches quicker and easier. Additionally, the VIN code can be used to verify the authenticity of the VIN and to check for any recalls or reimbursements related to the vehicle.

Step 2: Find out the vehicle’s emissions rating

Step 3: Check if the vehicle qualifies for the Vin verification program

To check if your vehicle qualifies for the VIN verification program, you can follow these steps:

Find out if your vehicle has been previously registered in another state and does not meet the emissions testing criteria.

Check if your vehicle is six years old or newer, or is brand new and has never been registered in any state.

If the vehicle does not meet either of these criteria, you will need a VIN verification.

Visit an Air Care Colorado inspection station and ask for a VIN verification.

Bring proof of ownership documents to the VIN verification station.

Pay the VIN verification fee of $25.

Receive a verification form that will be required to register your vehicle at the DMV.

If an emissions test is required, do not request or obtain a VIN verification as it will be completed when your vehicle is emissions tested.

Visit the CT DMV website to check if your vehicle is exempt from emissions testing.

Visit the DMV Inspection Lane to verify your VIN if necessary.

Step 4: Check if the vehicle is eligible for the 49-state inspection program

Step 1: Before the inspection can proceed, make sure the vehicle is in safe condition and there are no conditions, such as a gasoline leak, that present an immediate danger to either the inspector or the general public.

Step 2: Provide the current (and active) registration document with a valid vehicle identification number (VIN) that matches the one found on the left front side of the dashboard; and the $35 inspection fee.

Step 3: If the vehicle is required to receive an OBDII emissions test, and it does not qualify for a waiver, the vehicle must pass that inspection in order to receive an inspection sticker.

Step 4: The inspector will then carry out the inspection, which includes a visual overview, brake tests, exhaust system, steering and suspension, horn, glazing, glass and windshield wipers, rear view mirror, lighting devices, tires and wheels, bumper, fenders and fuel tank, altered vehicle height, seat belts, airbags, and fuel tank cap.

Step 5: If the vehicle passes all of these tests, it will be eligible for the 49-state inspection program.

Step 5: Go online and find out what information is available about your vehicl

If you want to find out more about a vehicle online, there are a few key steps you can take to learn more about its history. First, find the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), which is a unique code assigned to each vehicle. This code can usually be found in the vehicle registration book, and in several other places on the vehicle depending on the model. Once you have the VIN, you can use an online service like AutoDNA to get further information about the vehicle. This kind of service will provide you with information such as whether the car is registered in databases of stolen vehicles, the odometer readings, any damage it has had, any manufacturing faults you should know of, the previous use of the car, photos from the vehicle exploitation, technical data, how many previous owners it has had, and any hidden faults the seller has not mentioned. With all this information, you will be able to make an informed decision about the vehicle you’re considering.

Step 6: Compare different models and years

Step 1: Visit fueleconomy.gov and select the “Cars/Trucks/SUVs” tab.

Step 2: Select the year, make, and model of the vehicle you are interested in learning more about.

Step 3: On the vehicle’s page, you will find the vehicle’s estimated MPG, CO2 and other emissions figures, as well as other environmental ratings.

Example:

To compare a 2011 Honda Accord to a 2016 Honda Accord, visit fueleconomy.gov and select the “Cars/Trucks/SUVs” tab. Select “2011” from the “Year” dropdown, Honda from the “Make” dropdown, and Accord from the “Model” dropdown. On the page for the 2011 Honda Accord, you will find information about the estimated MPG, CO2 emissions, and other environmental ratings for this vehicle. Then, select the “2016” from the “Year” dropdown, Honda from the “Make” dropdown, and Accord from the “Model” dropdown. On the page for the 2016 Honda Accord, you will find information about the estimated MPG, CO2 emissions, and other environmental ratings for this vehicle. You can then compare the two vehicles and determine which one is the more fuel-efficient and environmentally-friendly option.

Step 7: Buy a report on as little as 13.90 €

If you want to buy a report on the vehicle emissions rating, the process is fairly straightforward. First, you will need to locate and enter the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) of the vehicle into the Air Care Colorado website. Once you have done this, you will be able to pay the emissions inspection fee of $25 biennial for 1982 and newer model year gasoline-powered vehicles or $15 annually for 1981 and older model vehicles. You can pay this fee with cash, checks or credit cards. After the payment has been made, you will receive an Emissions Inspection Certificate or an emissions inspection voucher. It is important to note that Air Care Colorado stations do not test diesel-powered vehicles.

Once you have the Emissions Inspection Certificate or an emissions inspection voucher, you can use the AutoDNA online service to purchase a report on the vehicle emissions rating. This service costs 13.90 € and provides verified information from reliable sources such as national administrations, financial institutions and central registers of vehicles. The report will include information on the vehicle’s odometer readings, previous use, damage history, technical data, and more. This is a great way to ensure that the car you are buying is in good condition and free from any hidden faults.

Step 8: Use COVID-19 update to know if your vehicle has been Vin verified or 49 state inspected

To obtain a VIN verification or a 49-state inspection, you will need to contact an Air Care Colorado inspection station. The inspection station will be able to provide a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) verification or a 49-state inspection. You will need to bring a current (and active) registration document with a valid vehicle identification number (VIN) that matches the one found on the left front side of the dashboard to the inspection station.

Step 1: Call or visit the Air Care Colorado inspection station to confirm whether your vehicle needs a VIN verification or a 49-state inspection.

Step 2: Once you have confirmed what type of inspection you need, make sure you have a current (and active) registration document with a valid vehicle identification number (VIN) that matches the one found on the left front side of the dashboard.

Step 3: If the vehicle requires an emissions inspection, drive the vehicle into the testing lanes. If the vehicle does not require an inspection, do not drive the vehicle into the testing lanes, instead ask for a VIN verification inside the station office.

Step 4: Provide the vehicle registration document and the inspection fee to the station.

Step 5: The station will run a VIN verification or a 49-state inspection.

Step 6: Once the VIN verification or 49-state inspection is complete, you will receive the documents from the station.

Step 9: Ask for an extension of your current inspection

Step 1: Check to see if you meet the requirements for an extension. To qualify for an extension, your vehicle must have passed all parts of the inspection, except the OBD-II readiness monitors.

Step 2: Contact your local DMV office to request the extension. You will need to provide the following information: your vehicle’s registration documents, VIN, and the original inspection fee.

Step 3: The DMV will review your request and determine whether or not you qualify for an extension. If your request is approved, you will receive an inspection receipt that includes a 10-day extension. Note that you cannot get more than one extension from the DMV.

Step 4: When your 10-day extension period is up, have your vehicle reinspected by a state-licensed inspector. You are entitled to one free re-inspection within 60 calendar days at the station that originally failed your vehicle. Every failing or passing inspection thereafter will be a paid inspection.