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How Can I Find Out the Vehicle’s Curb Weight Using the VIN?

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What is Curb Weight?

Curb weight is the total weight of a vehicle including standard equipment and required fluids, such as motor oil, transmission oil, coolant, AC refrigerant, and in some cases, a full tank of gas. It is the weight of a vehicle when it’s not being used and resting on a flat surface, and includes all necessary components such as fuel, oil, lubricants, and accessories that the car needs to run. It is the weight of the vehicle as it came out of the factory, with no cargo in the trunk or the cabin, no passengers, and no accessories other than what came with it as part of its standard equipment. The curb weight may vary slightly from one vehicle to the next, even if they are the same model, but it is an actual measurement of the vehicle’s weight that can be determined using tools and methods. It is also a metric that car manufacturers indicate for the vehicle, and is important for calculating the vehicle’s towing and loading capacities.

 

What Factors Affect the Curb Weight of a Vehicle?

1. Make and model of the vehicle

The curb weight of a vehicle can be affected by a variety of factors, including its size, the type of material it is made from, the engine type, and any optional features or accessories that have been added. Smaller vehicles, such as the Nissan Micra, typically weigh less than larger vehicles, such as the Chevy Tahoe, due to the amount of material and space used for its construction. The type of material used for the vehicle also plays a role in its curb weight, as lighter materials may reduce the overall weight of the vehicle. The type of engine used can also affect the weight of a vehicle, as larger and heavier engines add to the weight. Finally, any optional features or accessories added to the vehicle can also increase its curb weight.

2. Engine type

What factors affect the engine type weight of a vehicle? [Expanded list] The weight of a vehicle is affected by the type of material used to construct it, and the size of the vehicle. Smaller vehicles tend to be lighter than larger ones. Additionally, engine type, axle ratios, transmission, chassis, suspension, tires, load ratings, hitch type and class, trailer type, and optional features can all influence the vehicle’s weight. Finally, the manufacturer’s Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) ratings also come into play, as vehicles must meet certain standards in order to be sold.

3. Vehicle options

The type of vehicle and the options chosen will affect the curb weight of the vehicle. Different types of vehicles, such as cars, trucks, and SUV’s, have different weight ranges. For example, the average weight of a car in 2017 was 4,044 pounds, whereas the average weight of a truck was 4,500 pounds. When a VIN pattern is specific to a style or trim, a base curb weight can be determined. However, optional equipment added to the vehicle can change this value by hundreds of pounds.

Making a car lighter is possible by changing out the body panels and wheels. For example, replacing steel or aluminum body panels with lighter alternatives like GRP or glass-fiber reinforced plastic can help reduce weight. Changing out the glass windows to polycarbonate windows can also contribute to a lighter weight. Additionally, opting out of added comforts when choosing a trim level can reduce the overall weight of the car.

Overall, understanding the options available for vehicles and how they affect the curb weight is important. Installing lighter components like body panels and wheels or opting out of extra features can help reduce the weight of a vehicle. Lowering the weight of a vehicle can improve acceleration and performance.

4. Weight of the engine

The engine is one of the most important components in a vehicle, as it provides the power needed to move the car. This power is generated through the combustion of fuel, and the heavier the engine is, the more fuel it needs to produce the same amount of power. As a result, the weight of the engine has a direct effect on the curb weight of a vehicle. The more the engine weighs, the heavier the car will be and the more fuel it will require to keep it running. Additionally, a heavier engine will also reduce the acceleration and handling of the car, as more weight means more momentum is needed to achieve the same speeds.

5. Vehicle weight

The vehicle weight of a car depends on a variety of factors, including the type of material it is created from, the size of the car, and the features and safety equipment it is equipped with. Small cars, such as the Nissan Micra, tend to weigh less than larger vehicles, such as the Chevy Tahoe. In addition, modern cars are often equipped with a variety of features and safety equipment that add to the weight of the car. Examples of such features include rear climate control, heated and cooled seats, door intrusion beams, airbags, and laminated glass. The gross weight of a vehicle is generally more than the curb weight, as the current contents such as passengers, luggage, and payload are included in the calculation. Knowing the weight of a vehicle is important, as it can help determine the amount of weight the vehicle can safely carry, and it is also used by the DMV to properly register the vehicle.

6. Type of tires

What factors affect the tire weight of a vehicle? [Expanded list]: The type of material the vehicle is made from, the size of the vehicle, and the vehicle’s load capacity all affect the tire weight of a vehicle. The load capacity for a vehicle is determined by the weight of the vehicle as indicated on the “Tire and Loading Information” plate located inside the frame of the driver’s side door. Additionally, proper hauling and stabilizing the cargo can help prevent damage to the frame, engine, transmission, and tires.

7. Carrying capacity of the vehicle

There are several factors which affect the carrying capacity of a vehicle. These include the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) of the vehicle, the curb weight, the payload capacity, the tongue weight, and the Gross Train Weight (GTW). The GVWR is the maximum weight that the vehicle can safely carry, including passengers, cargo and payload. The curb weight is the weight of the vehicle itself, and the payload capacity is the maximum amount of additional “stuff” (such as cargo, passengers, fuel, etc.) that can be added to the curb weight. The tongue weight is the weight of the trailer tongue and is included in the payload capacity, and the GTW is the combined maximum allowable mass of the vehicle and trailer. Calculating the carrying capacity of a vehicle can be determined by subtracting the curb weight from the GVWR and the maximum towing capacity can be determined by subtracting the GVWR from the GTW. Lastly, it is recommended to keep the fully laden weight of the caravan no heavier than 85% of the kerbweight of the tow car as a safety guideline.

8. Size of the fuel tank

The size of the fuel tank directly impacts the curb weight of a vehicle. This is due to the fact that a larger fuel tank will add weight to the vehicle and thus make it heavier. As the size of the fuel tank increases, the vehicle’s curb weight will increase as well. This increase in weight affects the car’s overall performance, as it requires more energy to move a heavier object. This also impacts the vehicle’s fuel economy as larger fuel tanks require more fuel to be filled, thus using more fuel when driving. So, the size of the fuel tank directly affects the curb weight of a vehicle, resulting in decreased performance and fuel efficiency.

9. Vehicle’s cargo capacity

The cargo capacity of a vehicle affects its curb weight in a number of ways. When you load a vehicle with cargo, the total weight of the vehicle – including the weight of the cargo – is added to the curb weight of the vehicle. This increases the overall weight of the vehicle, which can reduce its performance and fuel efficiency. When the cargo capacity of a vehicle is exceeded, it can also put added strain on the vehicle’s components, such as its brakes and steering, and can lead to increased wear and tear over time. Ultimately, a vehicle’s cargo capacity plays a major role in determining its curb weight and can have a significant impact on its performance and safety.

10. Type of roof

The type of roof a vehicle has can greatly affect its curb weight. For example, a vehicle with an open roof such as a convertible or a pickup truck will typically have a lighter curb weight than a vehicle with a sealed roof such as a sedan or coupe. This is because an open roof reduces the amount of air trapped within the vehicle, meaning the vehicle’s structure is not weighed down as much. On the other hand, a vehicle with a sealed roof will have more air trapped inside, which can add extra weight to the vehicle. Additionally, the type of material used to construct the roof can also affect its curb weight, with materials such as aluminum being much lighter than steel or ceramics. Generally speaking, the lighter the material used, the lighter the vehicle’s curb weight will be.

 

How to Find out the Vehicle’s Curb Weight Using the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN)?

Step 1: Using a car scale

To use a car scale to find out the vehicle’s curb weight using the VIN, first locate a nearby car scale at a motor vehicle inspection location or car junkyard. If you have no clue how to use the scale, ask the people at the yard or inspection location to assist you. Next, have the VIN (vehicle identification number) of the vehicle ready. This will help the manufacturer to search for the exact vehicle year and model.

Then, approach the car scale and place the vehicle on it. Make sure that the vehicle is properly centered and not at an angle. Activate the scale and wait for the weight to be displayed. Take note of the weight, as it will be the car’s curb weight.

Lastly, compare the weight with the manufacturer’s website or the information plate located in the frame of the driver’s side door. If the weight is different, adjust the scale accordingly and record the correct weight. Once everything is done, the process is complete.

Step 2: Checking the driver side door

Step 1: Locate the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) on the driver’s side door.

Step 2: Call the manufacturer of your vehicle using the VIN and ask them for the curb weight of your vehicle.

Step 3: Alternatively, search for your vehicle’s manual online and consult the specifications section to find out its curb weight.

Step 4: If the owner’s manual is unavailable, look for a sticker on the driver’s side door. This sticker typically contains the curb weight as well as the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR).

Step 5: Lift your hood and locate the plate affixed to your engine. Some manufacturers will stamp the weight of your vehicle on the engine plate.

Step 6: For added accuracy, you can find a nearby car scale at a motor vehicle inspection location and car junkyards to measure the curb weight of your vehicle yourself.

Step 3: Checking the owner’s manual

Step 1: Check your vehicle’s owner’s manual for the curb weight and Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) of your vehicle. The curb weight is the weight of your car without passengers, cargo, or optional accessories. The GVWR is the total weight limit, set by the manufacturer, for a particular vehicle.

Step 2: Check the “Tire and Loading Information” plate located inside the frame of the driver’s side door. Many manufacturers will stamp the weight of the vehicle on this plate.

Step 3: Lift your hood and locate the plate affixed to your engine. Some manufacturers will stamp the weight of your vehicle on the engine plate.

Step 4: Call the manufacturer if the owner’s manual does not specify your vehicle’s curb weight. Have the VIN (vehicle identification number) handy when you call, so the manufacturer can readily search your exact vehicle year and model.

Step 5: Measure the curb weight of your vehicle yourself using a scale that can measure the weight of a car or truck. This method can be useful in case you have a vehicle that has been extensively modified. You can find a nearby car scale at a motor vehicle inspection location and car junkyards.

Step 4: Calling the manufacturer

Step 1: Gather the necessary information, such as the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), and have it handy.

Step 2: Contact the manufacturer by phone. Provide them with the VIN, and they can search your vehicle’s exact year and model to determine its curb weight.

Step 3: Check the manufacturer’s website to see if you can locate the curb weight there.

Step 4: If the curb weight is not available on the website, lift the hood and locate the engine plate. This plate may contain the weight of your vehicle.

Step 5: Check the “Tire and Loading Information” plate located inside the frame of the driver’s side door. This plate may contain the weight of your vehicle.

Step 6: If a vehicle is unlikely to be used at its potential maximum weight, it may be down-plated, so that a lower weight is given on the plate. If this is the case, contact the manufacturer and ask for a replacement plate that reflects the new weights.

Step 7: If you are still unable to locate your vehicle’s curb weight, contact your local Jobs & Benefits office or call 0800 587 1377 for assistance.

Step 5: Checking the TV choice 720P or 1080P

To check the weight of a vehicle, you can use the VIN. First, locate the “Tire and Loading Information” plate inside the frame of the driver’s side door. The manufacturer will usually stamp the weight of the vehicle on this plate. Then, using the VIN, you can look up the vehicle’s weight on a reliable website such as the VIN Decoder. This will provide you with the exact weight of your vehicle, so you can ensure you are not exceeding the manufacturer’s weight recommendation when towing.

Step 6: Using solar energy

Solar energy can be used to find out the vehicle’s curb weight using the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN). To do this, start by inputting the VIN into the solar-powered scanner. The scanner will then detect the car’s specific details, including the curb weight. This information can be used to help make decisions about the car’s weight and the types of parts that may be needed for the vehicle. For example, lighter body panels can be used to reduce the overall weight of the car, which can then improve fuel economy. Additionally, lighter wheels can be installed which can reduce the rotational mass of the rims and improve acceleration. Other options include keeping electronics and exterior features to a minimum, as these can add significant weight to the car.

Step 7: Payload vs. towing capacity example

Step-by-Step Instructions:

Look up the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) of the vehicle in question.

Use the VIN to find the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) and the Curb Weight of the vehicle. The GVWR is the maximum weight of the vehicle and its cargo, while the Curb Weight is the weight of the vehicle without cargo.

Subtract the Curb Weight from the GVWR to calculate the Payload Capacity of the vehicle.

Add the payload capacity to the Curb Weight to find the Gross Combined Vehicle Weight (GCVWR).

Subtract the Curb Weight from the GCVWR to get the Towing Capacity of the vehicle.

Example:

Let’s say you have a Ford F350 with a VIN of 1FTNX21L12EA12345. You look up the VIN and find out the GVWR is 14,000 lbs and the Curb Weight is 6,800 lbs.

Payload Capacity = GVWR – Curb Weight

Payload Capacity = 14,000 – 6,800 = 7,200 lbs

Gross Combined Vehicle Weight = Payload Capacity + Curb Weight

Gross Combined Vehicle Weight = 7,200 + 6,800 = 14,000 lbs

Towing Capacity = GCVWR – Curb Weight

Towing Capacity = 14,000 – 6,800 = 7,200 lbs

Step 8: Understanding solar solar energy guide

Understanding the solar energy guide can help with finding out the vehicle’s curb weight using the VIN by providing information on what type of components are necessary for the installation of solar systems and how much energy can be produced from them. This information can be used to calculate the vehicle’s curb weight, which can help ensure that the vehicle is within the legal weight limits for the road.